mdt:

did-you-kno:

Japan voted instant noodles as their best invention of the 20th century. Karaoke took 2nd place, while Pokemon came in 8th.
Source

Seconded.

I dunno, Walkman?

mdt:

did-you-kno:

Japan voted instant noodles as their best invention of the 20th century. Karaoke took 2nd place, while Pokemon came in 8th.

Source

Seconded.

I dunno, Walkman?

smithsonianlibraries:

Who flies an invisible plane, boasts equal parts strength and style, and says ‘Smithsonian’ like no other? Wonder Woman!
Vote for the Libraries’ copy of Wonder Woman #1 as most iconic object in the Culture section of Smithsonian’s Summer Showdown! 

smithsonianlibraries:

Who flies an invisible plane, boasts equal parts strength and style, and says ‘Smithsonian’ like no other? Wonder Woman!

Vote for the Libraries’ copy of Wonder Woman #1 as most iconic object in the Culture section of Smithsonian’s Summer Showdown

Reblogged from Turning the Book Wheel

buzzfeed:

Whoa.

Whoa, indeed

Reblogged from

keptyn:

The Most Quotable Movies Of All Time

Airplane! (1980) dir. Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, Jerry Zucker

Yep

Reblogged from laughterkey

cross-connect:

Fideli Sundqvist born 1987 in Uppsala, is the Swedish illustrator and graphic designer turned paper artist extraordinaire. Take a look, her incredible paper creations and tableaus speak for themselves.

Posted to Cross Connect by Margaret

Reblogged from CROSS CONNECT
wilwheaton:


Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Well, now I guess we need McKayla Maroney to play Wonder Woman…

wilwheaton:

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Well, now I guess we need McKayla Maroney to play Wonder Woman…

Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR

davidbowieunofficial:

endofrains:

Cover Stories

perfection

This is perfect.

Reblogged from FabulouslyFreespirited
nickelsonwooster:

Printing.
youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 
Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.
Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.


My mother-in-law has a couple of these. I love them.

nickelsonwooster:

Printing.

youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 

Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.

Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

My mother-in-law has a couple of these. I love them.

Reblogged from NICK WOOSTER
ronbaileyjr:

bandofbrotherslittlesister:

bulletsforamerica:

Reblog. Every. Single. Time. Always.

I’m the same way with this gif.

Semper fi to all my brothers and sisters out their and to the devil docs out their

ronbaileyjr:

bandofbrotherslittlesister:

bulletsforamerica:

Reblog. Every. Single. Time. Always.

I’m the same way with this gif.

Semper fi to all my brothers and sisters out their and to the devil docs out their

Reblogged from GtheGent

mymodernmet:

Nature photographer Erez Marom travels to Iceland each year to photograph breathtaking landscapes that capture the country’s dazzling beauty.

Reblogged from My Modern Metropolis