cross-connect:

Fideli Sundqvist born 1987 in Uppsala, is the Swedish illustrator and graphic designer turned paper artist extraordinaire. Take a look, her incredible paper creations and tableaus speak for themselves.

Posted to Cross Connect by Margaret

Reblogged from Cross Connect
wilwheaton:


Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Well, now I guess we need McKayla Maroney to play Wonder Woman…

wilwheaton:

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman, 1970s

Well, now I guess we need McKayla Maroney to play Wonder Woman…

Reblogged from WIL WHEATON dot TUMBLR

davidbowieunofficial:

endofrains:

Cover Stories

perfection

This is perfect.

Reblogged from FabulouslyFreespirited
nickelsonwooster:

Printing.
youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 
Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.
Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.


My mother-in-law has a couple of these. I love them.

nickelsonwooster:

Printing.

youmightfindyourself:

Before the advent of photography, Japanese fishermen created a novel technique for documenting their catch. Gyotaku is a form of printing that creates accurate renditions through a relief printing process. Rubbing sumi ink onto the body of a fish, and then gently pressing rice paper onto it and peeling it away will net an impression of the fish—distinct enough to note the shape and size of the species as well as the subtle patterns and textures of scales, fins, and gills. 

Dating back to the 1800s, original gyotaku prints were minimal in their appearance—made only in black ink without embellishment of texture, color, or added elements. The emphasis of these early prints was to prove the size and species of the fisherman’s “trophy fish” and to record this permanently. It was not until later when gyotaku became an art form that composition and color were considered.

Gyotaku is still widely used today in Japan and other coastal communities. Often in restaurant signage, this technique allows chefs to advertise their seafood specials with immediacy and honesty. Traditionally, the fish is printed with non-toxic ink allowing it to be cleaned and prepared as a meal after the printing process has been completed. The natural precision of gyotaku offers a pure form of graphic clarity—its simplicity demonstrates detached documentation yet highlights the personal achievement of the proud fisherman.

My mother-in-law has a couple of these. I love them.

Reblogged from NICK WOOSTER
ronbaileyjr:

bandofbrotherslittlesister:

bulletsforamerica:

Reblog. Every. Single. Time. Always.

I’m the same way with this gif.

Semper fi to all my brothers and sisters out their and to the devil docs out their

ronbaileyjr:

bandofbrotherslittlesister:

bulletsforamerica:

Reblog. Every. Single. Time. Always.

I’m the same way with this gif.

Semper fi to all my brothers and sisters out their and to the devil docs out their

Reblogged from GtheGent

mymodernmet:

Nature photographer Erez Marom travels to Iceland each year to photograph breathtaking landscapes that capture the country’s dazzling beauty.

Reblogged from My Modern Metropolis

mymodernmet:

Photographer Clark Little rushes straight into crashing waves to document the powerful force and beauty of the ocean.

Reblogged from My Modern Metropolis

cross-connect:

The Exquisite ’ Inner Space ’ Architecture of Matthew Simmonds

Hi, my name is Julien Martin, i was born in 1984 in Saint-Tropez, France. I left home when i was 16, travelled for 4 years the country with an italian circus and finally reached Paris in 2004. I got lucky and was accepted at the École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris because of my “exceptional” talent. Nevertheless i dropped out two years later, missing the feeling of being on the road. I travelled the south of Europe, Portugal, Spain and Italy. Now i am back to Paris and try to live of my art.

” Simmonds makes a play of architecture and ornamentation on a small scale, but the spaces created give the same feeling as in the buildings themselves; a place to rest, a place to travel with the eye and maybe find a moment of tranquillity. The marble is opened up, and inside is a space within a building that only exists in the viewer’s mind. What you sense is the significance of space.” ( Artodyssey )

Selected and Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew

Reblogged from Cross Connect
The story begins, like many good stories do, in a pub. As early as the Middle Ages, Szymanski explains, the rough outlines of soccer—a game, a ball, feet—appear to have been present in England. But it wasn’t until the sport became popular among aristocratic boys at schools like Eton and Rugby in the nineteenth century that these young men tried to standardize play. On a Monday evening in October 1863, the leaders of a dozen clubs met at the Freemasons’ Tavern in London to establish “a definite code of rules for the regulation of the game.” They did just that, forming the Football Association. The most divisive issue was whether to permit “hacking,” or kicking an opponent in the leg (the answer, ultimately, was ‘no’).

But that wasn’t where the controversy ended. In 1871, another set of clubs met in London to codify a version of the game that involved more use of the hands—a variant most closely associated with the Rugby School.

“From this point onwards the two versions of football were distinguished by reference to their longer titles, Rugby Football and Association Football (named after the Football Association),” Szymanski writes. “The rugby football game was shortened to ‘rugger,’” while “the association football game was, plausibly, shortened to ‘soccer.’”

Both sports fragmented yet again as they spread around the world. The colloquialism “soccer” caught on in the United States in the first decade of the twentieth century, in part to distinguish the game from American football, a hybrid of Association Football and Rugby Football. (Countries that tend to use the word “soccer” nowadays—Australia, for example—usually have another sport called “football.”)
Reblogged from laughterkey